Transforming the Math Classroom With Flipped Instruction – An Interview with Stacey Roshan

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In this episode, Alan speaks with Stacey Roshan, an AP Calculus and Algebra II teacher at Bullis School in Potomac, Maryland. Alan talks with Stacey about the transformation of her classroom to one that utilizes the flipped classroom model, after attending BLC in 2010. Using this model, Stacey has seen vast improvement in her students understanding of advanced math concepts. Her insights on how she got started, how she got her message out to parents and how she manages her class will be very valuable to those looking to make this shift.

Stacey will run a pre-conference master class and will be a presenter at this year’s Building Learning Communities Conference, being held in Boston, Massachusetts in July. We look forward to having you join our global community.

Enjoy the podcast!

Sample screencasts are available at http://about.me/staceyroshan/

Students Teaching Students Through Club Academia – An Interview with Shilpa Yarlagadda

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In this episode of the November Learning Podcast Series, Alan speaks with Shilpa Yarlagadda, a current student at Gunn High School in Palo Alto, California, and founder of Club Academia. Alan and Shilpa discuss how Club Academia, a global resource of education material created for students and by students came to be. They also discuss how the work in Club Academia is highly valued by many students as well as how the Club Academia team ensures that their published work is of the highest quality.

Shilpa will be a keynote speaker and presenter at this year’s Building Learning Communities Conference, being held in Boston, Massachusetts in July. We look forward to having you learn from Shilpa and the many other fantastic presenters we will have at this event.

Learn to Code; Code to Learn – An Interview with Dr. Mitch Resnick

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In this episode of the November Learning Podcasts Series, Alan speaks with Dr. Mitch Resnick, Professor of Learning Research and Director of the Scratch Team at MIT. The two discuss why coding is such an important element to bring into the educational process, at all ages, and they exchange their ideas on why global publication through an online community add an important aspect into this online, coding tool. In the end, Dr. Resnick also shares an exciting announcement about upcoming developments.

Dr. Resnick and the Scratch team will lead a pre-conference master class at this year’s Building Learning Communities Conference, being held in Boston, Massachusetts in July. These sessions are always a highlight of our yearly event. You won’t want to miss it.

You’re Never Too Young to Go Global – An Interview with Kathy Cassidy

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In this episode of the November Learning Podcast Series, Alan speaks with Kathy Cassidy, a first grade teacher in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. Since 2005, Kathy’s first grade classes have shared their learning with the world through a class blog. Kathy shares how this opportunity has expanded the boundaries of learning with classrooms around the world, and has helped her students become leaders in building online community. Additionally, Kathy shares the thoughtful process she uses in keeping her students safe as they share in this online environment.

Kathy will be a presenter at this year’s Building Learning Communities Conference, being held in Boston, Massachusetts in July. We certainly hope you will join us in this one-of-a-kind global learning experience.

The most successful students are those who feel real “ownership” of their education

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Via a blog bost by Joshua Koen:

Thomas Friedman, in his Op Ed post in the New York Times, Can’t We Do Better?, summarizes the results from “. . .the Program for International Student Assessment, or PISA, which compare how well 15-year-olds in 65 cities and countries can apply math, science and reading skills to solve real-world problems” as “. . .the most successful students are those who feel real ‘ownership‘ of their education. In all the best performing school systems, said Schleicher, ‘students feel they personally can make a difference in their own outcomes and that education will make a difference for their future.’”

Alan November has been asking for years, Who Owns the Learning?, and the results of this assessment further confirm that this essential question is right on target.

So to take this to the next step, we as educators and educational leaders must continue to reflect on what we can do to empower students, teachers, and schools to own their learning. This is our challenge, and with access to a global network of subjects, resources, and people, we need to leverage technology to tap into students’ interests, make assignments more authentic, and use tools to create more powerful teaching and learning experiences.

New Article: Why Schools Must Move Beyond One-to-One Computing

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As many schools and districts are now rushing to buy every student a digital device, our concern is that most one-to-one implementation strategies are based on the new tool as the focus of the program. Unless we break out of this limited vision that one-to-one computing is about the device, we are doomed to waste our resources.

In this article, Alan explains how a simple shift in language (one-to-world rather than one-to-one) can help jump start discussions that focus more heavily on teaching and learning, rather than on the devices themselves.

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