Jul. 29, 2010

Itunes Podcasts IconSubscribe

Talking Student Tutorials with Eric Marcos – Part 2 of 2

This is the second part of Alan’s discussion with Eric Marcos, BLC presenter and middle school teacher in Santa Monica, CA. In this episode, Eric, his students and Alan focus on the student created tutorials’ impact on how students are learning and how Eric can evaluate problems individual students might be having.

Eric also describes the skills and equipment that teachers would need to start a similar program in addition to new opportunities that his classes are becoming involved with through their work.

3 Responses to “Talking Student Tutorials with Eric Marcos – Part 2 of 2”

  • Kim Lacaria

    This is a wonderful idea that would be really beneficial for the students. Teachers would also get an insight into how the students are doing the problems, what they might be doing wrong, and how to help them understand the concept.

    I think this would be great from the students that are absent from school, to download a podcast from that day and get the instruction they might need to complete a task. The only drawback that I can see would be those students without access to the technology. Working in a lower socio-economic school I know that a lot my students didn’t. One way it might work is to record introductions to new concepts and let the students take home the lesson. But that also creates the problem of will they return the technology.

    Reply
  • -->
    1. IdeaJam Videos Posted – Moderated by Alan November | November Learning says:

      […] – The Digital Learning Farm Talking Student Tutorials (Part 1): A Podcast with Eric Marcos Talking Student Tutorials (Part 2): A Podcast with Eric Marcos Building Legacy Within a Textbook: A Podcast with Garth Holman and Michael Pennington Flipped Model […]

    2. Kim Lacaria says:

      This is a wonderful idea that would be really beneficial for the students. Teachers would also get an insight into how the students are doing the problems, what they might be doing wrong, and how to help them understand the concept.

      I think this would be great from the students that are absent from school, to download a podcast from that day and get the instruction they might need to complete a task. The only drawback that I can see would be those students without access to the technology. Working in a lower socio-economic school I know that a lot my students didn’t. One way it might work is to record introductions to new concepts and let the students take home the lesson. But that also creates the problem of will they return the technology.

    3. Pat Cezniak says:

      This helps the instructor see what misconceptions a student has of a particular concept and correct it.

    Leave a Reply

    Additional Posts: