Dec. 19, 2011

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Learn From a School That Has Completely Flipped Out – An Interview with Greg Green on Flipped Learning Model

BLCFeatureTopicWhile many individual and small clusters of teachers have been utilizing the flipped learning model within their classrooms, Greg Green, Principal at Clintondale High School, located just outside of Detroit, Michigan, has been pioneering the infusion of this model across his entire school. In this episode, Alan and Greg discuss how this effort began and continues to develop as well as the substantial improvement this model has brought over past failure rates amongst his school’s at-risk population.

Greg Green will be a presenter at the 2012 Building Learning Communities conference being held this sumer in Boston. To learn more, visit http://www.blcconference.com.

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4 Responses to “Learn From a School That Has Completely Flipped Out – An Interview with Greg Green on Flipped Learning Model”

  • David

    Great Job. I loved listening to this podcast. I have a few questions to follow up…

    If so many of your students are on free and reduced lunch, how do they watch the videos for homework? We have 90% on free and reduced lunch in my district, and roughly 30% have an internet connection at home.

    I’d also like to know how you are hosting all your videos? I was anticipating using YouTube with our Google Apps account.

    Reply
  • Joe Rueff

    In high schools many students have regular jobs after the school day. Some work from 4:00 to as late as 10:00 p.m. Many are also involved in extra curricular activities which take hours of time after the school day. How do these students utilize these techniques? Wouldn’t many miss key inputs necessary for follow-up dialogue?

    Reply
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    1. ann omura says:

      I am interested in how much time students use to watch the video presentations before they come to class or in class. I teach English; I would very much like to see a video of the pre-class video information the students receive. It makes sense to provide a master teacher presentation. Does that happen in class or does it take the place of “homework”?

    2. Greg Green says:

      Videos are shown both for homework and at the beginning of class. They are short 5-7 minutes. You can view a sample video at http://www.flippedhighschool.com under the English drop down for first semester. Thank you.

    3. David says:

      Great Job. I loved listening to this podcast. I have a few questions to follow up…

      If so many of your students are on free and reduced lunch, how do they watch the videos for homework? We have 90% on free and reduced lunch in my district, and roughly 30% have an internet connection at home.

      I’d also like to know how you are hosting all your videos? I was anticipating using YouTube with our Google Apps account.

    4. Joe Rueff says:

      In high schools many students have regular jobs after the school day. Some work from 4:00 to as late as 10:00 p.m. Many are also involved in extra curricular activities which take hours of time after the school day. How do these students utilize these techniques? Wouldn’t many miss key inputs necessary for follow-up dialogue?

    Leave a Reply

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    Led by Alan November and based in Marblehead, MA, November Learning equips teachers and administrators to motivate students to own their learning and make global connections by using effective technology and implementing rigorous assignments. Through our annual Building Learning Communities conference, professional development services and extended resources, our team of experts empowers educators to enact powerful changes across the curriculum, drawing on students’ abilities to think critically, communicate globally, express creativity and collaborate across several types of media.

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